Never Too Old To Hit The Gym — How Functional Movement Supports Geriatric Health

By Alex Rubio

Crossfit at age 79? Move over, youngsters — there’s a new age group taking over the gym. National Academy of Sports Medicine (NASM) nutritionist and personal trainer Anthony Santana explains why there’s no upper age limit for regular exercise:

“Some of the benefits of lifting weights as you start to get older include the improvement of muscle and bone density,” says Santana, “As well as an improved level of strength and stability. It also improves your cardiovascular health, helps with chronic disease — and preventing chronic disease — and it also improves your posture and your overall quality of life.”

The style of exercise Crossfit prescribes is called “functional movement,” which is essentially a set of applied movements that one would use in everyday life.

“Before Crossfit, I couldn’t jump rope,” says 79-year-old Carson City resident Kathy Shaw, “When I cleaned my house, I could only do one room at a time — I would have to stop and rest. And I used to fall a lot! But [since I started training], I’m not falling any more.”

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